Knowledge Of Al-Anon support-groups

The Brief History Of Al-Anon

Al-Anon is support groups all over the world that where people affected by alcoholism in one way or another meet to share experiences and help each other. The goal of theses groups is to be advantageous and therapeutic.


Al-Anon was founded in 1951 as an organization for providing support to friends and relatives of drunkards. Lois Wilson, well-known simply as Lois W, whose husband launched Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), laid the foundation of Al-Anon organization 16 years after AA was established. Dealing with the difficulties of providing support to a recovering alcoholic during her life, she decided to create an organization for people similar to her. Al-Anon is an organization self-supported through member donations. The meetings aim to help members cope with and know how to support and help their loved ones fighting alcoholism.


These groups help their members know there are others like them.


Alcoholism Affecting A Family

Since it has a deleterious influence on both the drinker and those around them, Al-anon treats the disease of alcoholism as a family illness. Important to the alcoholic's recovery is the friend and family support system.

Many family members are known to blame themselves for the drinking problem of their loved one, and in many cases do not understand why the recovery of their loved one is a priority. These problems are handled by meetings and members are assisted to understand alcoholism as a family illness.


Alateen- Al-Anon Meetings Intended For Teenagers

A particular group called Alateen assists young people impacted by alcoholism in their family is also run by Al-Anon.

During the Al-teen meetings, the youth meet with their peers and share experiences and support each other at their level.


Reasons To Partake In An Al-Anon Group

Members benefit from Al-Anon because they are introduced to many people and families who suffer from alcoholism. The best part about this program is that you can all relate with the same issue. The main benefit of Al-Anon is having an opportunity to find and talk with individuals who's had similar experiences. Al-Anon meetings are held throughout the nation. There is always an Al-Anon program near you and you just need to get in touch with us on 0800 246 1509 .


What You Should Anticipate From A Meeting

If you know someone who is an alcoholic, then Al-Anon is the best place for you. You just need to identify whether the alcoholism of a particular individual is concerning you and make it known it is affecting your lifestyle, and rest assured that Al-Anon can provide the assistance you need.

Since they are sure what will happen, some people don't feel free to go to the first meeting. What you must remember when you attend an Al-Anon meeting

  • Al-Anon is anonymous meaning you do not identify yourself in the meeting
  • Every member from the organization has been affected by alcoholism regardless of whether it is a personal problem or through a family member
  • While members are encouraged to speak up and discuss their problem, they are under no obligation to do so
  • Different Types Of Meetings Are Held For Everyone
  • Some may be more beneficial for you than others.
  • This group is not affiliated to any religion
  • Al-Anon meetings follow the 12 Step program

The Al-Anon meetings work on the "take what you like and leave the rest" philosophy Based on this formula the meetings concentrate on the sharing of experiences and the hardships of the attendees rather than giving them any instructions about what they should do.


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Al-Anon 12 Steps

Usually, meetings start with someone reading from the 12 step program. These twelve steps are an abridged, almost verbatim, quote from the same-name program of Alcoholics Anonymous. Members of Al-Anon can take help from a sponsor who can assist them to work through the steps and is available for any support needed during hardships of any kind just as the case is with Alcoholics Anonymous. The 12 Steps are as follows

  • We admitted we were powerless over alcohol that our lives had become unmanageable.
  • The members learn how to accept alcohol addiction as an illness, which they cannot control if somebody else suffers from it.
  • Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  • Members often drive themselves to the brink in an attempt to change or control their loved one.
  • The members then recognise the fact that there is a solution out there for them.
  • Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  • It is important that members learn to let go.
  • Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  • Self-discovery plays a huge role in making the steps; and this is its beginning.
  • The group members write down a list of the instances when they may have been unfair to themselves or their significant others (for example, threats).
  • Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrong doings.
  • Thats a study of each listing in the group members moral inventory, which enables them to delve into each problem.
  • Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  • This is an important step because it comes after accepting in full that the recovery process is supported by a greater power.
  • Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  • In this stage, the members get to assess how their presence or activities could have affected the addicts negatively.
  • Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  • Very often, righting a wrong starts with yourself.
  • Most people believe they caused their loved one to start drinking.
  • They must learn to forgive and make it right for themselves.
  • Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  • After you are willing to make amends, the following step is to act on it.
  • Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  • Passing through these twelve Steps is a time-consuming process.
  • Members are ready with an inventory, yet making an error is common.
  • Step 10 makes this clear that the process takes long.
  • Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious effort with god as we understood him praying only for the knowledge of his will and the power to carry that out.
  • This is a step that is personal and spiritual to encompass acceptance and comfort amid the stress of recovery.
  • Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to others, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.
  • The last step is a realization that the members journey has not finished.
  • After this, group members are encouraged to support others by sharing what they have already learned.

Recognising The Higher Power

Members do have an acceptance of a higher power, even though Al-Anon is not a religious program. Every member has their own religion affiliation. Al-Anon does not interfere with a member's religious convictions.